Branding Options.

When deciding on the best branding option for your items, there is no one shoe fits all approach. The right method is dictated by the material that we’re printing on, the size and the volume of the products that require branding. We’ll make sure that we recommend the best option for you. If you’d like to know a bit more about it, take a look at each option here.

A method of machine stitching your design or logo onto fabrics or apparel. Click here to see a video of the embroidery process.

THE UPSIDE

  • Allows for a raised, premium branding output
  • Can be a cost-efficient option when branding area is small

THE DOWNSIDE

  • If the branding area is large, this option can become inefficient (we’d possibly look at a printing option instead)
  • Small intricate details can often be lost

Screen printing is a technique best suited to flat or cylindrical surfaces. This is where ink is pushed through a mesh screen onto the product or substrate via a squeegee. If you’re wondering how this is done, take a look at this video.

THE UPSIDE

  • A quick drying printing option which can mean earlier delivery times
  • A cost-efficient option for large volume runs
  • Can match closely to your PMS colours when printing on lighter surfaces

THE DOWNSIDE

  • PMS colours can sometimes vary from desired when printing on dark surfaces.

One of the most practical and popular branding options. Pad printing uses a silicone pad to transfer an image to a product from a laser etched printing plate. Click here to see a video of the pad printing process.

THE UPSIDE

  • Cost efficient
  • Can print across varying curved surfaces
  • Can match closely to your PMS colours when printing on lighter surfaces

THE DOWNSIDE

  • PMS colours can sometimes very from desired when printing on dark surfaces
  • Half tones can be difficult to achieve
  • The more colours included in the print, the higher the cost

Ideal for metal and glass items including pens, key rings, travel mugs, wood surfaces and glassware. Click here to see a video of the laser engraving process.

THE UPSIDE

  • Permanent
  • Enhances the base colour of an item
  • High quality finish

THE DOWNSIDE

  • Branding space is restricted on curved surfaces
  • Branding can vary from item to item depending on the materials. A pre-production sample is recommended.

Achieved by heat transferring a digitally printed full-colour dye image from a paper transfer to the product. A common method for printing onto mugs, towels, and apparel. Click here to see a video of the sublimation process.

THE UPSIDE

  • Renders a high quality, vibrant and full-colour branding
  • Can print with only 1 setup for minimal quantities

THE DOWNSIDE

  • Only suitable for printing onto white product surfaces
  • PMS colours are only approximate

A full colour printed label with a resin coating and a strong adhesive on the back that forms a permanent bond to the decal. Click here to see a video on the resin printing process.

 

THE UPSIDE

  • Can produces a striking 3-dimensional effect
  • Great for spot colour as well as vivid full-colour branding

THE DOWNSIDE

  • PMS colours can only be approximate
  • Resin coating needs a full day for curing once it has been applied before it can be shipped
  • Larger printing areas are generally more costly

A common method for printing onto fabrics.  The image is printed using a CMYK process that applies heat and pressure to transfer the image. Click here to see a video on the digital printing process.

THE UPSIDE

  • Achieves a clean presentation of the image or brand
  • An efficient way to brand full-colour images

THE DOWNSIDE

  • PMS colours are approximate only
  • A thin clear line of glue can sometimes be seen around the edges of the image

 

Debossing is a technique where a hot engraved metal plate is pressed into the surface of a product with a lot of pressure (an indented image). You can watch a quick video on debossing here. Embossing produces a raised finish. Foil can be added to the embossing process resulting in a silver or gold raised logo. See the video here.

THE UPSIDE

  • Allows tones of colour and complex logos to be reproduced exactly
  • Adds depth, and texture

THE DOWNSIDE

  • Can be costly to set up

 

A process where molten metal or plastic is injected into a mould cavity to form a 3-dimensional branding output. This can be used on materials such as rubber, foil, cloth, paper, fibre, corrugated fibreboard, paperboard, plastics foam and sheet metal. You can see a video on the die cutting process here.

THE UPSIDE

  • Allows complex logos to be reproduced exactly
  • Adds depth

THE DOWNSIDE

  • Can be costly to set up

Supacolour is a modern printing technique. The colour is produced digitally, meaning the images can have an abundance of colours without the need for expensive setups. Unlike digital transfers it does not print the background, allowing for even the most detail logo to be clear cut. You can see a video on the supacolur process here.

THE UPSIDE

  • Can produce photo quality detail
  • Less costly than other digital printing methods

THE DOWNSIDE

  • PMS colours are approximate

Kiln fired decals are transfers that are printed with a ceramic ink which are then fired at very high temperatures in a kiln. We use this printing process when working with glassware and mugs. You can see a video of the kiln fired process here.

THE UPSIDE

  • The print is permanent
  • A good option when printing on irregular sized glassware and mugs

THE DOWNSIDE

  • Can be costly

Hot stamping or foil stamping is a printing method where a pre-dried ink or foil is transferred or ‘stamped’  onto a surface at a very high temperature. You can see a video of the hot stamping process here.

THE UPSIDE

  • Produces a premium /high-quality printing output
  • Is permanent
  • Can be used across a range of products including; confectionary, notebooks, calendars, labels and pencils

DOWNSIDE

  • Can be expensive to set up